How I got started

Here are my prerequisites:

1. Economics Degrees from UCSB (so I know complex math, but had to learn engineering math)

2. First started to solder and toy with Electronics when I was mod-ingy Fender Telecaster

3. In Modifying my Telephone I replaced the capacitor on the tone pot and replaced the potentiometers

4. I was amazed that in spending $5 I made my $400 1975 Tell sound better than my $4,000 Les Paul…so I realized there was something there.

5. I picked up an O-scope, a Lab Bench Power Supply and Tons of $1 books on eBay from the 50s that were used textbooks for electrical engineering.

6. My goal was to make a synthesizer (which is probably the absolute hardest thing you can possibly make…I still haven’t done it) so along the way I learned how to make, well, lots of things. I’ll get into each project separately.

7. I researched thousands of hours how each Electronic component worked. Especially op amps. I bought a 1000 page text-book and read and copied every page, did every problem, and when I got through I felt pretty solid.

8. I bought books on Transistor theory and applications. I bought books on mathematics, physics, materials science, and EVERY book by Forrest Mimms until I felt like I could understand computers on a ‘spiritual’ level. Binary? Fuck ya! Boolean Logic? You know it, Bra! Frequency domain? What you want? Laplace or Fourier Transforms cuz I got that shiiit…

9. Some people think it’s a waste of time…but I got a job at a place called tech shop where I prototype products for people (I provided the Electronics Expertise). I was paid for it too. And people were impressed. Because iade things that worked.

So I want to walk you through how I learned this stuff and use my notes that hopefully anyone can learn from. Because the textbooks provide a university level knowledge that is dense because they are written under the assumption you know calculus and physics. I will present theory and physics necessary only to understand how it all works.

’til next time,

Danny

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